Archive for the ‘Olde’ Category

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Snails in Medieval Manuscripts: Another Getty Center Exhibit

February 2, 2012
Adam Naming the Animals

Adam Naming the Animals

 

 

I’m adding this image to my collection of snail images from the Middle Ages:

 

 

http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=305896&handle=li

http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/gothic_grandeur/

Adam Naming the Animals

Adam Naming the Animals

 

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Rosy Renaissance Art Cards and Prints

October 18, 2010

Earlier today I met Zlatka Paneva of Rosy Renaissance. She was exhibiting her art prints and cards at “Affaire in the Gardens,” an art show that’s been held in Beverly Hills since 1973.

I like to mix historical and contemporary themes in my own work, and admire Paneva’s designs for taking this approach. Her artful mix of 16th-century imagery and vintage graphics is clever and sophisticated.

Here’s the link to shops across the US and Canada that carry the RosyRenaissance line.

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Looking for Medieval Art Lovers in LA: Illuminated Manuscript Course

October 6, 2010

Looking for Medieval Art Lovers in LA:

Illuminated Manuscript Course
Getty Center, UCLA Extension Westwood

October 17-November 7, 2010 (six meetings)
10-1 pm

Do you have a passion for any of the following:

  • The Getty Center
  • Book illustrations, especially children’s book, fairy tales, fantasy literature and Arthurian legends
  • Medieval or early Renaissance art
  • Persian miniatures
  • Renaissance Fairs (SCA folks, this is the class for YOU)
  • Anime, manga and graphic novels
  • Old books, fairy tales, fantasy literature
  • Stuff covered with gold leaf
  • Brilliant colors
  • Exquisite miniature objects
  • Calligraphy
  • Filigree, ornament, curlicues
  • Gothic architecture
  • Painting and drawing
  • Antiques
  • ???

Kelly Williams, a Getty Center Educator, teaches a six-week course called “Illuminated Manuscripts: Patronage and Process.” I took this course a month ago, and absolutely loved it, as did the other students. You don’t really need any training in art to take this course and enjoy yourself thoroughly, but being able to sketch or at least copy a design on paper is enough. You will get to use the same materials and techniques that were used to make priceless objects now in museums all over the world. The Getty Center has one of the world’s best collections of illuminated books, and Kelly Williams will take you on a guided tour (free parking) on the first day of class. Ms. Williams is a highly sought-after teacher, having recently traveled to the White House to teach drawing to the Obama family. So we’re talking excellence here.

The class is offered through UCLA extension. Go to uclaextension.edu and navigate to the art studio section. I’m sorry to say that this site needs better navigation. Don’t you want our money, UCLA? There’s no direct link to “how to register” or anything obvious, but there is a greyed-out tab that says “Quick Enroll” but you need the course number. You will still need to register with your email, etc. and if all else fails, call them at (310) 825-9971 or (818) 784-7006. Monday to Friday, 9 to 5.

The course number is ART X 440.68 and is listed in studio art although it’s really a combination of art history and studio. You can get two units of credits for your $375. And the class meets 10-1 on Sundays, so for the five days the class meets in Westwood parking will only cost you $4-5 (not the $13.50 I shelled out today!!!). And did I mention you get free parking at the Getty?

A note about supplies: You only need to budget $25 for supplies. The majority of the very costly items, genuine gold leaf and natural pigments, are included in the course price. These are of the finest quality, hand-selected by the Getty for their historical authenticity (any toxic materials like white lead are NOT used in this class).  If you were to try to purchase these materials on your own, you would need to spend $250-300 or more. So enjoy the rare opportunity to try them out.

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Medieval Modernity

April 12, 2007

I didn’t invent the phrase “Medieval Modernity”; I found it on a post at badaude.typepad.com. Christopher Whalen’s comment led me to domeheid

[I don’t think blogspot offers trackbacks; but I’m still trying to figure them out.]

I’m always seeking out combines like this, the juxtaposition or synthesis of old and new. My Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil is sitting on my desk in Oxford, waiting for my return. It’s a crewel embroidery, heretofore undisclosed. I have high hopes for its capturing old/new + form and content. We’ll see.

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New face to maryyaeger.com

March 17, 2007

I couldn’t stand it any more. I just slapped a new front page onto maryyaeger.com.

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Is this it?

March 11, 2007

 Mary

I’m an artist who is known best for my embroidered merit badges about female rites of passage. Over the past decade I’ve followed my urges to explore medieval imagery, beadwork, miniature theatres, and the arts and crafts movement. I’ve kept embroidering and sought to weave together the many strands I’ve got tangled up in, always seeking a way to blend contemporary and historical ideas.

Dave and I have had the enormous good fortune to spend a sabbatical year here in Oxford. What a great time to celebrate turning 50. Our adventures will certainly take up a large portion of my postings, as will my research into traditional English embroidery, illuminated manuscripts and William Morris.

“animary” is the name that has stuck and speaks to my single attempt at computer animation, as well as my constant effort to keep up with the creative tools of technology.

I do wish things would move along a little faster, but as usual the process of creating seems too slow.