Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

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Snails in Medieval Manuscripts: Another Getty Center Exhibit

February 2, 2012
Adam Naming the Animals

Adam Naming the Animals

 

 

I’m adding this image to my collection of snail images from the Middle Ages:

 

 

http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=305896&handle=li

http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/gothic_grandeur/

Adam Naming the Animals

Adam Naming the Animals

 

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Kickstarter.com: Hope for the Artistic Innovator

August 7, 2011

Thank you again, Rob Walker. The NYT magazine, as always my source for the best and brightest:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/07/magazine/the-trivialities-and-transcendence-of-kickstarter.html

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Early Comics = Medieval Manuscripts: UCLA Extension Course

February 28, 2011

Kelly Williams is offering the 3-week course The Medieval Comic Book: Illustrated Stories in Illuminated Manuscripts. You’ll get first-rate art instruction that begins with a lecture and hands-on demo, then is held on site  for two meetings at the Getty, then finally in a studio class held work with the materials and techniques in a studio class held at 1010 Westwood where students work with the materials and techniques. One unit of arts credit can be earned. The class costs $195.

I took a similar version of this course last summer. Kelly Williams is an excellent instructor, with expertise on a subject rarely taught in this format. A huge bonus is getting to use (and bring home the leftover) authentic pigments like lapiz and real gold leaf.

Course description:

https://www.uclaextension.edu/r/Course.aspx?reg=W1591

(Estimated supplies cost is $25.) Before manga and movies, decorated books inspired and awed the public by illustrating famous religious and secular tales. This three-part course explores stories in illuminated manuscripts through lecture, discussion, a museum visit, and a studio session. The first class investigates how and why these books were made and includes a hands-on exploration of medieval materials used in their creation. Class two visits the Getty Museum for an extended tour and sketching exercise of the exhibition “Stories to Watch: Narrative in Medieval Manuscripts.” The third session is a studio class, where students use manuscript templates to create their own illuminated page. Internet access required to retrieve course materials.

Westwood: 415 1010 Westwood Center
Saturday, 10am-1pm,
March 12

Los Angeles: Getty Center
Saturday, 10am-1pm,
March 19

Westwood: 321 1010 Westwood Center
Saturday, 10am-1pm,
March 26

3 meetings total

Another post about medieval art you might enjoy:

https://animary.wordpress.com/2010/08/17/discovered-got-medieval-by-craig-pyrdum/

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Design Pattern with Visual Thesaurus

January 26, 2011

Did Visual Thesaurus plan this, or is it just a happy accident?

Design Pattern using Visual Thesaurus

Design Pattern using Visual Thesaurus

If you look up the word “design,” then select the connector between pattern and figure,  voila, this lovely shape fans out, just like a peacock!

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“Some Implications,” by Kurt Ulrich

November 19, 2010

Some Implications

By Kurt Ulrich

1

Thirst does not believe in what
might cure and thus
destroy it. Thirst

concocts a dream of the ocean
dry as a bone, but
full as ever; and my bridges

never completely burn—thirst
prevents them from this,
gathers force with its elongated

figures of an evening
such as the talk with
El Greco inspired. Imagine

you had managed a meeting
with the utmost more
grace than you had expected:

the guests would never leave or they’d
seem to be hiding,
to have gone so quickly they would

seem either never to have gone,
never to have really arrived,
or to always have been, or

be yet to come.

2

Rafters of a type we’re less
than only a little
accustomed to, and devised

under the ice-blue
lights of an ordinarily
pale enthusiasm

for rote good humor, seem,
scaled, sturdier by
far than when, straining our

backs in order to
see them in relation to the
drapes and decorations

our usual homes entail, they
did little more than trace
the arc of the heavens; did

little more than the grass
might flow, that is; and
held no home away from

what is perhaps richer, graver,
more deliberate and thrilling
an environ, but which should

be sampled by and by, as befits
an entire neighborhood, and not
in such a manner as would

keep us from sleep, too immune
to a kingdom divided
from our fondest dream.

3

Today it’s that there’s not
really enough for us to merit
that splendid regard

of the luminous—were
there enough we’d be
probably much worse off than where

the whole thing stews today: under
something dark and crisp and
electric, cold, and heedless. I

have sanctioned these poems
exude charm, but nothing distracting,
nothing visual, expected or

cooperatively italicized. Clouds
are suggestive and familiar, and
find us at least most of the time

on our way to the building
in the rare clear city, tears
in our eyes as we continue to

expend our sway inappropriately,
toward the darling little flowers
who travel in schools, and toward

the women happily married, or so
they thought. Blush of clarity, tolerant
impossible private hue, our passions are

only and all for you, but then
you’re gone and the day turns
sunny, damn it, everything’s

easy to understand, everything
tags along after us, asking us
what to do, and paying us

a compliment full of deadlines
as good as a threat, while our children
turn pale as clouds, as you.

 

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Keith Richards ‘stab to the heart’

October 29, 2010

I read this excerpt from Life by Keith Richards, in David L. Ulin’s review in today’s LA Times:

“‘to write a song that is remembered and taken to heart,’ Richards notes, ‘is a connection, a touching of bases. A thread that runs through all of us. A stab to the heart.'”

 

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Getty Center Workshop on Drawing Drapery with Zhenya Gershman

October 27, 2010

Last week I took a 3-hour workshop with Zhenya Gershman at the Getty Center. I signed up for the class because I wanted to develop more facility with the drawing of drapery. My miniature illustrations,  such as  Media and Melancholy and Bipolar Depression and Family Support, contain figures wearing heavy robes.  I plan to continue using historical costume in my paintings, so mastering the “ins and outs” of drapery is important to me.

I expected the class to be useful but not necessarily fabulous. I didn’t bother to review the instructor’s credentials, so I was delighted to find out that  ZG is not only a master teacher, but a child prodigy, having received artistic acclaim in her native Russia from the age of 10!

Zhenya introduced herself individually to each student before the class started.  More teachers should do this; it establishes trust early and builds student confidence. Z projects tremendous energy and enthusiasm. Her lecture with images was deceptively breezy; to present so much content so clearly requires much research and preparation. The handouts were first-rate, concise yet suitable for  beginner or advanced student. A lot to take away for a 3-hour workshop!

I’m taking the “warts and all” approach and revealing my class drawings here. The first was from Z’s visual description and not from looking at the drapery:

drapery sketch first attempt

Sketch 1

I’m comfortable looking at things and sketching them, but not necessarily with drawing something from memory. So the result looks a little stereotypical, but I applied the idea of tension points that Z presented.  Note the point where the folds start to cascade.

Being more comfortable with looking and drawing at the same time, I came up with Sketch 2, based on fabric pinned to a form:

second drapery sketch

Sketch 2

While we were sketching,  Zhenya presented the idea of the “eye” of the fold, which was new to me. This is where “the fold is formed when pressure pushes material out in the center to form a more prominent point. The ‘eye’ is the starting point of all the planes.”*

This sounds technical but it’s easy to see, especially in classical drawings and paintings. You just have to look for it.

Enough with my drawing lesson. Here is the final sketch from a Flemish painting in [the location and artist into to be added later]. We had 45 minutes to work, so I got absorbed and forgot to write down the source.

Drapery Final Sketch

Final Sketch

For upcoming Getty Center short courses for adult learners, go to http://www.getty.edu/visit/calendar/events/Courses.html

*from Zhenya Gershman’s August/October 2010 handout